• Created By : 20-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Mineral Species
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10 mm sperrylite crystal, Broken Hammer Prospect,
Val Caron, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

Probably the most exciting mineral discovery in Canada in 2011 was a new find of exceptionally large, museum quality crystals of sperrylite (PtAs2) at the Broken Hammer deposit in Val Caron, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, in 2011. In the early Spring of that year, Wallbridge Mining, which owns the property, drilled and blasted a roughly 20 x 30 meter prospect pit. A Wallbridge employee discovered the crystals close to the edge of this pit. Later, smaller crystals in a different matrix were discovered in the wall of the pit. The newly discovered crystals are brilliantly lustrous, very sharply crystallized, and very pure. The largest crystals reach 15 mm in size. The large crystals were found in an area is no more than a few square meters, in a surface occurrence of a massive, rotted chalcopyrite-millerite matrix.

  • Created By : 23-Jun-2016
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Mineral Species
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Specimen photos©TreasureMountainMining.com   


INTRODUCTION
Gem sugilite is a polycrystalline aggregate: a massive gem material that is colored a very attractive purple-violet color, due to the presence of manganese. It is named for Ken-ichi Sugi, the Japanese geologist who discovered it in 1944 on an island in Japan. This material bears no resemblance to the gem grade purple sugilite that was found in 1979 at the Wessels Mine in South Africa. There was some controversy about the true identity of this material, which was originally thought to be sogdianite, but was soon shown to contain a small amount of manganese and no zirconium, and was thus proven to be the rare mineral sugilite. It is also known as lavulite.

 

  • Created By : 28-Jul-2015
  • Write By: tmmadmin
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3.1" 39g Rich Cherry Red & Crayon Orange Gem Zincite Crystal Group Poland for sale

Click here to see all of our zincite specimens

Zincite is not precisely a natural mineral because it came from the Tarnowskie Góry smelter in Upper Silesia, Poland. A finite, limited number of crystals of this extraordinarily beautiful mineral developed when a furnace wall at the smelter fractured in a singular event in the late 70's. As reported by the smelter superintendant, the zincite was formed in a one-time event when a smelter chimney sprang a leak, allowing an excess of oxygen to mix with the fumes inside the smelter. The oxygen that came in through the crack combined with the zinc to form zinc oxide (zincite). Zincite was then deposited in air vents, from which it was later collected. This material proved to be a success on the mineral market, and so lower quality zincite was later collected from chimneys and flues of similar refineries in Olkusz and several other areas.