• Created By : 16-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Mineral Species
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10.5" Polished ocean jasper slab, Marovato, Madagascar

Ocean Jasper is a beautiful gem material, identified by a unique pattern of eyes, or "orbs" on a swirling, striped background of vibrant color. It often includes vugs lined with white or green druzy quartz crystals. It is found in only one place in the world: along the rugged northeast coast of Madagascar. According to Mindat.com, the full locality is Marovato, Ambolobozo, Analalava District, Sofia Region, Mahajanga Province, Madagascar.

  • Created By : 21-Jun-2017
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  • Published In: Mineral Species
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Penas Blanca Emerald Mine, Boyacá Department, Colombia

At the 2017 edition of the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show, one of the new introductions and stars of the show was chrome fluorite from Colombia's Penas Blanca Emerald Mine. This mine is on the northern edge of the Western Emerald Bearing Belt, or Boyaca Belt, north of Muzo. It is unique for its absence of pyrite and other sulphides and the presence of fluorite. The mine also produces notable calcite, barite, dolomite, water-clear quartz, and of course, emeralds. The locality is near Mun. de San Pablo de Borbur, in the Vasquez-Yacopí Mining District, Boyacá Department, Colombia.

  • Created By : 20-Dec-2014
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6 mm 3.6 carat twinned platinum crystals

Platinum is the rarest and most expensive precious metal - more so than either gold or silver. And platinum crystals are even rarer - so rare that, until a few years ago, they were considered to be the rarest objects on the face of the earth! Because of their scarcity and prohibitively high price, the vast majority of mineral collectors could not afford to buy platinum crystals. As a result, they were usually only seen in very high end mineral collections. This situation changed in the decade following the 1993 appearance on the mineral market of world class platinum crystals that came from an alluvial deposit in Siberia. The cubic, metallic, pale gray, slightly edge-rounded crystals reportedly reach a size of about 1.5 cm. The exact locality is the Konder Massif (also spelled Kondyor), in the village of Konder, near Nel'kan, Aldan shield, Ayan-Maya district, Khabarovskiy Kraj, Far-Eastern Region, Russia.

  • Created By : 20-Dec-2014
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7.5" pyrite group of 38 cubic crystals to 1.6" - Logrono, Spain

Pyrite, or iron pyrite - infamously known as "Fool's Gold" - is a shiny, brassy-gold mineral that is commonly mistaken for gold. It can have sparkling, mirror-bright luster, and forms in a vast variety of interesting crystal habits, which makes it extremely popular among mineral collectors. Pyrite is the most common of the sulfide minerals - a group which includes galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and arsenopyrite. Ironically, despite its "fool's gold" nickname, pyrite and gold are often found together. Actually, it's easy to tell the two apart, as pyrite is much lighter in color, less dense, and harder (gold can be scratched with a knife or fingernail).

  • Created By : 20-Dec-2014
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13mm 9ct Red beryl crystal, Ruby Violet Claims,
Wah Wah Mountains Beaver Co., Utah

Specimen photos © www.TreasureMountainMining.com

Photos of the Ruby Violet Claims courtesy of Gary Harris

Reddish-magenta beryl, in a color sometimes described as "gooseberry red", is the rarest form of beryl (a mineral family which includes emerald, aquamarine, morganite, golden beryl and goshenite). The only locality for red beryl crystals suitable for faceting is in the Wah Wah Mountains near Beaver, Utah. This is the only place in the world where gem quality red beryl has been found.

  • Created By : 20-Dec-2014
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10 mm sperrylite crystal, Broken Hammer Prospect,
Val Caron, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada

I recently heard from Tom Johnson, the surveyor who works for Wallbridge Mining, who originally found and collected the large sperrylite crystals from the Broken Hammer occurrence in the Spring of 2011. He told me that there actually were a good number of large crystals found in matrix, but that these are still on hold pending resolution of the export situation. He also reported that the lower zone, which produced most of the smaller crystals on quartz/epidote matrix, was actually found before the weathered chalcopyrite material near the top of the wall of the cut. The larger crystals, the "mother load" so to speak, was found by panning the broken material of the pit wall and finding a few large fragments that he traced upwards to where they originated. A few 3-4 mm crystals in the wall in weathered chalcopyrite were the only indication of what was found later.