• Created By : 09-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
  • Hits: 3337
  • Comment: 0


View of the world's premiere mineral market: the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show - Eric Greene Photo

Arguably, there has never been a better time than right now to collect mineral specimens. Growing worldwide interest in collecting has led to an increased supply of fine, high-quality specimens such as the world has never seen. This growth has made it possible for individual collectors - even those with relatively limited budgets - to build interesting, significant, and valuable collections. All of this has happened because of the development of today's robust fine mineral market.

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
  • Hits: 21554
  • Comment: 0

When I look at a mineral, the first thing I usually notice is its color. How can you help but be attracted to the riveting red of a Tasmanian crocoite, the vibrant violet of Uruguayan amethyst, and the glowing green of an emerald? But what really produces these colors? Why do most minerals have their own specific colors (for example, green emeralds)? And why is it that sometimes the same mineral is found in many colors (think fluorite: blue, green, purple, yellow, orange, red, pink, etc.)? Unfortunately, the answers to these seemingly simple questions are remarkably complex. In fact, physicists have identified at least 14 different causes of color!

  • Created By : 02-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
  • Hits: 2852
  • Comment: 0

My undergraduate degree was in fine arts - specifically, sculpture. What better training could I have received to be a mineral dealer, since fine mineral specimens are mother nature's own sculptures - natural works of art in shapes and colors and arrangements that are beyond what any artist could possibly dream of creating. Over time, serious collectors often develop a special appreciation for the aesthetic beauty of fine minerals specimens. And if they do any research, they may also acquire real scientific knowledge about how and why crystals form. Together, these talents inspire a collector's passion for building a personally satisfying, valuable collection of these natural treasures.

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
  • Hits: 4776
  • Comment: 0


2" Tanzanite crystal, Merelani Hills, Umba Valley, Lelatema Mountains, Arusha Region, Tanzania

Crystals are solids with a naturally geometrically regular form with symmetrically arranged plane faces. Their internal structured is made up of molecules, atoms or ions connecting together in a regular, ordered, three-dimensional repeated pattern. The word crystal comes from the Greek word krustallos, meaning "ice" and "rock crystal", and from kruos, meaning "icy cold, frost".