• Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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Economics? What does the price of wheat in Chicago have to do with finding fine mineral specimens to buy? Well, you might be surprised!

  • Created By : 02-Dec-2016
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Some, but not many of us mineral collectors are blessed with unlimited space to display and store our mineral collections. Even in our 13-room house, we don't have space for everthing (and Jeanne has a rule: no mineral specimens in the part of the house we live in!). So, like other factors to consider in building a mineral collection (color, quality, species, locality, etc.), size does matter, and collectors must think about what size they want to collect. For example, consider this: you can display 1,000 thumbnail-sized specimens in the the space required to keep 50 hand-sized specimens. That certainly puts it in perspective!

Here are the names for the different sizes that I use as "standards".

  • Created By : 14-Apr-2016
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(High-Quality-Low-Price Specimens for $100 or less)

For many years, Thomas Moore, an editor at Mineralogical Record has written about what he calls High-Quality-Low-Price (HQLP) mineral specimens in his show reports from Tucson, Munich, etc. I like this idea, as it shows that contrary to popular perception, it is possible to build a fine collection without spending a fortune. In fact, as the world economy has continue to lag or decline over the last five years, more and more, mineral buyers are learning that inexpensive doesn't have to equate to poor quality.

  • Created By : 21-Jan-2016
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by Tim Jokela, Jr.

This is a list of abbreviations and unusual jargon commonly used by mineral collectors. These are the more common terms a neophyte collector is likely to be confused by. Explanations of the terms are kept short in the interest of brevity. Sources of definitions and some terms include Sinkankas' Mineralogy and a 1974 editorial by John S. White Jr., in MR V5 #2.

  • Created By : 30-Nov-2014
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Since there are over 7,000 recognized mineral species, your chances of acquiring one of each for your collection is practically zero. This is why most mineral collectors choose to specialize in some way as they build a collection.

There are as many special areas of interest in the mineral kingdom as there are collectors, so there are no hard rules here. Your specialty or specialties (why stop with one?) depend entirely on what attracts you in a mineral specimen. You’ll also hear the word suite used to describe an area of specialization, frequently to denote minerals from a particular mine, region, or state. Here is a list of some common specialties or suites, with examples of each:

  • Created By : 24-Nov-2015
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See full-size photos below

Controversy has swirled around lab-grown mineral specimens for centuries. Collectors generally fall into one of two groups on this issue:

1. First, there are the die-hard folks who are uncompromising about their mineralogy, who are likely to say, "No lab grown minerals in my collection, period."
2. Then there are those who are not so adamant, and who appreciate the beauty and perfection of man-made mineral specimens regardless of the source.

So who is right? They both are! To me, it is a matter of personal taste, not right or wrong (although some hard-core mineralogists might disagree with me on this!).