• Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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How would you pack these specimens for shipping?

  • Created By : 20-Jan-2016
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A sneak peek inside the Treasure Mountain Mining photo studio

I admit it - I love it when people tell us that they think we have "the most beautiful crystal and fine mineral photos on the internet." While we enjoy the compliments, the real stars of the show are the minerals themselves - bright red rhodochrosite, canary yellow sulfur, emerald green fluorite, cornflower blue tanzanite, and so on. When we take photos, we are 100% focused on accurately capturing the true colors of these amazing minerals. Because every specimen is truly unique, we photograph every single specimen. And, what you see is what you get: We do not take "generic" pictures, and then send the buyer a different piece. Here is the scoop on what we do when we take photos.

  • Created By : 02-Dec-2014
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Odd as it may sound, we don't really want to sell you a mineral specimen. You see, we are in the business of building relationships with our customers, because we hope you will become a valued friend. Our mission is to earn your trust by providing you high-quality specimens for sale at sensible prices with excellent customer service. When we succeed at doing this, people come back to buy from us again and again. We love helping our friends build valuable mineral collections that they will take pleasure in, cherish, and be proud to own for years to come.

  • Created By : 30-Nov-2014
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Recently, with the stock market plummeting, interest rates at record lows, and mortgage foreclosures at all time highs, I have been giving customers the tongue-in-cheek advice to “buy rocks, not stocks”. So, that’s a joke, right? Or is it?

Many dealers and collectors argue that today, fine minerals are a better investment than many, more conventional forms of asset investment. This includes gemstones, which have traditionally been considered a safe haven against inflation, and are also relatively easy to sell.

  • Created By : 14-Nov-2014
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If you are interested in rocks, minerals, lapidary work, fossils, or any other aspect of earth sciences, you may find that joining a local mineral club is a great way to expand your knowledge, meet like-minded collectors, make new friends, and discover new collecting spots. Here are some tips.

  • Created By : 23-Jul-2015
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This raspberry-and blue-colored tourmaline —nicknamed the “Steamboat ”—is one of the world’s finest and most valuable mineral specimens; it was collected in Pala, California

There has been much discussion recently in the mineral community about the impact of the 1% phenomenon on the price of specimens. By "1%", I am referring to the growing disparity between ordinary people and the very small number of people: the ones who earned over 20% of total income in the U.S. Expensive minerals have become a status symbol for wealthy people, just like expensive sports cars and art. Mineral dealers refer to this phenomenon as the "high-end market," generally defined as specimens with a price tag of $10,000 and up into the millions. High-end mineral specimens can mean different things to different people. The best definition I have seen is from Jolyon Ralph, who heads Mindat (www.mindat.com). He defines a high-end mineral specimen as "…one that commands a high price because it is of particular aesthetic appeal, or because it is of an especially fine quality or from a classic or particularly noteworthy location." The most expensive crystal on record is the "Rose of Itaitia," a red tourmaline from Brazil.