• Created By : 28-Jul-2015
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3.1" 39g Rich Cherry Red & Crayon Orange Gem Zincite Crystal Group Poland for sale

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Zincite is not precisely a natural mineral because it came from the Tarnowskie Góry smelter in Upper Silesia, Poland. A finite, limited number of crystals of this extraordinarily beautiful mineral developed when a furnace wall at the smelter fractured in a singular event in the late 70's. As reported by the smelter superintendant, the zincite was formed in a one-time event when a smelter chimney sprang a leak, allowing an excess of oxygen to mix with the fumes inside the smelter. The oxygen that came in through the crack combined with the zinc to form zinc oxide (zincite). Zincite was then deposited in air vents, from which it was later collected. This material proved to be a success on the mineral market, and so lower quality zincite was later collected from chimneys and flues of similar refineries in Olkusz and several other areas.


The Deccan Traps in Maharashtra, India

Since the 1970s, the state of Maharashtra in India has provided an abundant supply of zeolites and other minerals that have come out of the enormous lava flows called the Deccan Traps. The traps are arguably the largest volcanic feature on the earth. They consist of hundreds of layers of flood basalt over 6,500 feet thick, which cover almost 200,000 square miles - larger than the state of California. Basalt quarries in this region produce hundreds of tons of mineral specimens every year, creating a glut that keeps the price for most of these pieces amazingly low. Zeolites are a popular group of minerals to collect because they are so beautiful and because they contain such diversity in color, crystal form and rarity (some are very common and inexpensive to collect and some are rare, costly, and a pleasure to finally own). Most all the specimens come from basalt quarries which provide material for the building boom that has gone on in central India for the last 40 years. Others are found when wells are dug and when construction projects for buildings and roads require blasting.

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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2" Tanzanite crystal, Merelani Hills, Umba Valley, Lelatema Mountains, Arusha Region, Tanzania

Crystals are solids with a naturally geometrically regular form with symmetrically arranged plane faces. Their internal structured is made up of molecules, atoms or ions connecting together in a regular, ordered, three-dimensional repeated pattern. The word crystal comes from the Greek word krustallos, meaning "ice" and "rock crystal", and from kruos, meaning "icy cold, frost".


19 pound 11" Brassy GOLDEN PYRITE Pyritohedral Crystals -Peru

This year in Tucson the wholesale price for good Peruvian pyrite specimens was triple what it was two years ago in 2011. I asked several dealers about this, and was given several reasons:

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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When I look at a mineral, the first thing I usually notice is its color. How can you help but be attracted to the riveting red of a Tasmanian crocoite, the vibrant violet of Uruguayan amethyst, and the glowing green of an emerald? But what really produces these colors? Why do most minerals have their own specific colors (for example, green emeralds)? And why is it that sometimes the same mineral is found in many colors (think fluorite: blue, green, purple, yellow, orange, red, pink, etc.)? Unfortunately, the answers to these seemingly simple questions are remarkably complex. In fact, physicists have identified at least 14 different causes of color!

  • Created By : 23-Jun-2016
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Click here to see our current selection of sugilite specimens

Specimen photos©TreasureMountainMining.com   


INTRODUCTION
Gem sugilite is a polycrystalline aggregate: a massive gem material that is colored a very attractive purple-violet color, due to the presence of manganese. It is named for Ken-ichi Sugi, the Japanese geologist who discovered it in 1944 on an island in Japan. This material bears no resemblance to the gem grade purple sugilite that was found in 1979 at the Wessels Mine in South Africa. There was some controversy about the true identity of this material, which was originally thought to be sogdianite, but was soon shown to contain a small amount of manganese and no zirconium, and was thus proven to be the rare mineral sugilite. It is also known as lavulite.