• Created By : 09-Dec-2014
  • Write By: tmmadmin
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Mineral collectors collect crystals and minerals because they like them. Nearly all collectors are attracted to the extraordinarily beautiful colors and dramatic shapes in the mineral world. Most love the fact that they are natural objects that have been dug from the earth. Some appreciate their scientific and geological significance, while others are drawn to their metaphysical qualities. Whatever the reason, it is inherent that collectors want to exhibit their collection in their homes to share with family and friends. And it makes sense that a collection that you have invested your time and money in should be shown to best advantage.

  • Created By : 30-Nov-2014
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Many collectibles, such as stamps and coins, are assessed based on just two factors: rarity and condition. Evaluating a fine mineral or crystal specimen is more akin to looking at a sculpture. When viewing and displaying the specimen, or debating its aesthetic merits, many criteria must be considered. Some of these are highly subjective (“Oh my, isn’t that pretty!”), while others are fairly concrete and scientific (e.g., what habit does a crystal display?).

Of course, a specimen can also be beautiful and important simply because you enjoy its appearance. Still, the more knowledgeable you become about the factors which affect this perception, the better able you will be to identify and select fine quality mineral and crystal specimens. And the better the specimens you pick, the higher the quality level of your collection, and the more you will be able to enjoy it. Who hasn’t experienced disappointment when looking at specimens acquired as a novice collector? I certainly made mistakes back then, and I definitely don’t want to repeat them today.

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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I recently received an email from a favorite customer who is a "serious" mineral collector, chiding me for using metaphysical terms to describe a mineral specimen. He said:

  • Created By : 31-Oct-2014
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I started collecting minerals when I was 8 years old, then quit when I discovered girls at age 13. Later in life, my interest was re-kindled when my son Dan was playing in the field behind our house and found a chunk of glacial quartz with a vug containing crystals. My original goal was to share this wonderful hobby with my three children, especially the part about going out in the woods and finding buried treasure. Gradually, this goal evolved, and I ended up being bitten hard by the mineral collecting “bug” (some would call it an addiction). As my passion grew, I plunged in head first, and began building a mineral collection. As I proceeded, I made a series of blunders, the results of which still plague me today when I open one of the drawers containing my old collection. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a mentor – someone who could have steered me in the right direction, so that I could avoid the pitfalls which, in retrospect, seem so obvious today. So, here’s the advice I have learned through hard experience, and that I wish someone had given me along the way. I hope it helps you to build a collection of fine minerals and gem crystals that you will be proud of today, and that will still be a source of happiness and wonder in years to come.

  • Created By : 23-Dec-2015
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Mineral collectors love to look at fine mineral specimens! It is very exciting to inspect and handle a good piece, because it gives you the opportunity to look at it very closely and notice "up close and personal" such details as crystal structure, sharpness of crystallization, intensity of color, clarity of gemmy crystals, luster, contrast, and so on. But in doing so you surely do not want to damage the specimen, so learning how to pick up, hold and handle, and put down a specimen without causing harm is essential to maintaining a quality mineral collection and to remaining on good terms with dealers and other collectors who let you look at their collection. The fact is that certain minerals and stones are very fragile, very soft, or highly sensitive to pressure or changes in temperature, any of which can result in damage. Yet many collectors, especially those who are new to collecting, do not know how to properly handle specimens.

  • Created By : 09-Dec-2014
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You've probably heard people talk about the "Golden Age of Mineral Collecting," perhaps referring to the 1800s in England, or the period from 1860-1910 in the U.S., or to some other time and place. Typically these were times when outstanding mineral specimens from classic localities (almost invariably now closed) were abundant and very affordable. For example, in the U.S. in the late 1880s, newly opened mines in the lead-zinc region of Missouri, the Bisbee copper mines in Arizona, the copper mines in Michigan, and the Franklin, New Jersey zinc mines were all producing an abundance of superb specimens.