• Created By : 22-Mar-2016
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Mineral Show Reports
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Downtown Tucson

Near the start of every year, Tucson becomes the world's biggest playground for everyone interested in gem and mineral trading, buying, bargains and bragging rights. Tucson is quite literally 3 weeks of mineral madness, pulling in thousands of treasure hunters from every corner of the globe.

  • Created By : 21-Jan-2016
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
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by Tim Jokela, Jr.

This is a list of abbreviations and unusual jargon commonly used by mineral collectors. These are the more common terms a neophyte collector is likely to be confused by. Explanations of the terms are kept short in the interest of brevity. Sources of definitions and some terms include Sinkankas' Mineralogy and a 1974 editorial by John S. White Jr., in MR V5 #2.

  • Created By : 20-Jan-2016
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
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A sneak peek inside the Treasure Mountain Mining photo studio

I admit it - I love it when people tell us that they think we have "the most beautiful crystal and fine mineral photos on the internet." While we enjoy the compliments, the real stars of the show are the minerals themselves - bright red rhodochrosite, canary yellow sulfur, emerald green fluorite, cornflower blue tanzanite, and so on. When we take photos, we are 100% focused on accurately capturing the true colors of these amazing minerals. Because every specimen is truly unique, we photograph every single specimen. And, what you see is what you get: We do not take "generic" pictures, and then send the buyer a different piece. Here is the scoop on what we do when we take photos.


Rock face showing embedded pyrite crystals

by David Rusterholz

David contacted me in the summer of 2015, to ask about going to Navajun to collect. He is an avid collector, Chemistry Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, and President of the St. Croix Rockhounds of Stillwater, MN. David asked a bunch of questions about what it is like collecting at Navajun. Apparently I answered his questions satisfactorily because in late November he and his wife Becky Kleager made the pilgrimage to Navajun, Spain to do some pyrite collecting at Mina Ampliación a Victoria. Below is his report. -Eric

  • Created By : 23-Dec-2015
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Your Collection
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Mineral collectors love to look at fine mineral specimens! It is very exciting to inspect and handle a good piece, because it gives you the opportunity to look at it very closely and notice "up close and personal" such details as crystal structure, sharpness of crystallization, intensity of color, clarity of gemmy crystals, luster, contrast, and so on. But in doing so you surely do not want to damage the specimen, so learning how to pick up, hold and handle, and put down a specimen without causing harm is essential to maintaining a quality mineral collection and to remaining on good terms with dealers and other collectors who let you look at their collection. The fact is that certain minerals and stones are very fragile, very soft, or highly sensitive to pressure or changes in temperature, any of which can result in damage. Yet many collectors, especially those who are new to collecting, do not know how to properly handle specimens.

  • Created By : 24-Nov-2015
  • Write By: tmmadmin
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See full-size photos below

Controversy has swirled around lab-grown mineral specimens for centuries. Collectors generally fall into one of two groups on this issue:

1. First, there are the die-hard folks who are uncompromising about their mineralogy, who are likely to say, "No lab grown minerals in my collection, period."
2. Then there are those who are not so adamant, and who appreciate the beauty and perfection of man-made mineral specimens regardless of the source.

So who is right? They both are! To me, it is a matter of personal taste, not right or wrong (although some hard-core mineralogists might disagree with me on this!).