• Created By : 23-Jun-2016
  • Write By: tmmadmin
  • Published In: Mineral Species
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Click here to see our current selection of sugilite specimens

Specimen photos©TreasureMountainMining.com   


INTRODUCTION
Gem sugilite is a polycrystalline aggregate: a massive gem material that is colored a very attractive purple-violet color, due to the presence of manganese. It is named for Ken-ichi Sugi, the Japanese geologist who discovered it in 1944 on an island in Japan. This material bears no resemblance to the gem grade purple sugilite that was found in 1979 at the Wessels Mine in South Africa. There was some controversy about the true identity of this material, which was originally thought to be sogdianite, but was soon shown to contain a small amount of manganese and no zirconium, and was thus proven to be the rare mineral sugilite. It is also known as lavulite.

 

  • Created By : 17-Jun-2016
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  • Published In: Mineral Species
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Click here to see all of our ammolite specimens.

WHAT IS AMMOLITE?

Ammolite is an organic gemstone made from the nacre-like shells of fossilized ammonites which are found in Alberta, Canada. Its primary feature is its brilliant, iridescent colors, which are result of the material's opal-like qualities. Ammolite is mainly composed of aragonite, CaCO3. It is also known as aapoak, gem ammonite, and korite (a trade name). Ammolite is found on found on the shells of fossil ammonites from the Upper Cretaceous period (135 million years old). Ammolite is rare, occurring in only one small area near St. Mary River in southwestern Alberta, Canada.  

  • Created By : 12-May-2016
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lapis
6.1" 4.0 pound gem grade polished lapis lazuli

Lapis Lazuli is a semi-precious gemstone, prized for over 6,000 years for its intense blue color. The name lapis lazuli means blue stone. It is a popular semi-precious gemstone today, and is arguably one of the world's most important opaque gemstones.


Just outside the mine entrance, a miner drives the locomotive

Photos by Eric Greene taken during a June, 2015 visit to the Rogerley Mine

 

It seems I jumped the gun. In our early March newsletter, I wrote: "Another noteworthy event this year was the announcement that UK Mining Ventures that 2015 was their last year of mining at the Rogerley Mine in England." Apparently this is not necessarily the case. While there are some substantial hurdles which must be overcome in order to continue mining, happily there appears to be light at the end of the tunnel.

  • Created By : 14-Apr-2016
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(High-Quality-Low-Price Specimens for $100 or less)

For many years, Thomas Moore, an editor at Mineralogical Record has written about what he calls High-Quality-Low-Price (HQLP) mineral specimens in his show reports from Tucson, Munich, etc. I like this idea, as it shows that contrary to popular perception, it is possible to build a fine collection without spending a fortune. In fact, as the world economy has continue to lag or decline over the last five years, more and more, mineral buyers are learning that inexpensive doesn't have to equate to poor quality.

  • Created By : 13-Apr-2016
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A Note from the TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE DEPARTMENT:
CORRECTION ON THE AJOITE PSEUDOS


3.6" Neon Aqua-Blue CHRYSOCOLLA CRYSTALS Pseudo Malachite/Azurite D.R.Congo for sale

I knew I should have trusted my initial instincts. It was early February out in Tucson, and I saw a specimen labeled "Ajoite Pseudo after Azurite" in a dealer's display case. The problem was that I had been selling the exact same material for several years, and had always labeled it as "Chrysocolla Pseudo after Azurite." Max Mpuye had been selling me great specimens of this colorful material since it first appeared at the East Coast Show in 2012. Here's how I described one of the specimens: